To Okmulgee, final day!

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Okmulgee (Final Day of the Ride)

Good morning, everyone

Greetings from the last day on the road. Today we ride to Okmulgee to complete the last leg of the Ocmulgee to Okmulgee journey.

Yesterday we completed the Removal Trail portion when we arrived at Fort Gibson, Oklahoma. Fort Gibson was a type of “Ellis Island” for large numbers of Native people who made the forced removals (either by land or by boat or barge) to Indian Territory. Native Peoples arrived from the Trail under the escort of U.S. soldiers or civilian companies who had been contracted or sub-contracted by the U.S. Government to assist in the removal of the thousands people. Fort Gibson was the last stop before our ancestors — our foremothers and forefathers — made their way to the designated territories in our new homeland. Counts were taken at Fort Gibson of the new arrivals to Indian Territory — the naming came years later during the Dawes Commission and the allotment period.

It was a strange feeling arriving in Fort Gibson yesterday. It was a wonderful joy to see our friends, families, and tribal members welcome us back. One can only imagine that yesterday’s events stand in stark contrast to the original arrivals in that there were no welcoming committees and likely no smiles.  Yesterday, we were also welcomed back to Oklahoma — our new homeland. My Muscogee (Creek) lineage comes from Central Alabama; we had just visited there. Many other Creek families can trace their lineage and heritage to this area of Alabama. We have also traveled from Georgia where large numbers of Creek people proudly once lived. Our ancestral homelands in these areas remain and will continue to remain important to us. It is important for Creek people of all age-groups to know where we came from, what made us Creek people. Knowledge, understanding, pride, and protection of this past also sustains and helps guide us into the future. As Muscogee (Creek) people, We are here in Oklahoma now. Our Families are here. Our Friends are here. Our Loved Ones are here. Oklahoma may not be our Ancestral Home, but it is a home.

This project was conceived as an educational venture to spread the word among Muscogee (Creek) people (wherever they might currently reside) about the Creek Removals and Creek history. This project was also developed to reassert, reaffirm, and convey our cultural and deep historic and pre-contact presence in our Ancestral homelands of Georgia and Alabama and to present the Muscogee (Creek) side of the story. This project was developed to inform non-Creek people about Muscogee history and heritage. This project has proven to be a truly successful collaborative effort. Thank you to all of our supporters and partners!

We as Muscogee (Creek) people are among the true descendants of the Mississippian Moundbuilders of Ocmulgee and Etowah. We are the descendants of those who survived the Removal. We are all also the living embodiment of those who perished along the way. We as Creek people stand strong to honor the achievements and sacrifices of our ancestors.

For those of you out there who have shown interest in this project, MVTO!

Tallassee to Tulsa, Okemah to Okemah, Eufaula to Eufaula, Okfuskee to Okfuskee, Ocmulgee to Okmulgee. THE MUSCOGEE (CREEK) NATION.

We’ll see you soon,

John Beaver–Program Manager/Director and Curator, Muscogee (Creek) Nation Museum and Cultural Center

 

 

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Greenleaf State Park to Fort Gibson, OK

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Fort Smith, AR to Greenleaf State Park, OK

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We had Dr. Grounds and riders from the Yuchee Language Project join us on the ride from Fort Smith to Greenleaf State Park to Fort Gibson. Mvto for their participation in joining the ride! Next set of pictures will be … Continue reading

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Ride to Okmulgee – June 23rd, 2012

Good evening from Ft. Smith, Arkansas:

It is hard to believe, but we are already in the homestretch. We will be in Oklahoma in a matter of hours.

I have received some questions and inquiries about joining us for the ride to Okmulgee on Saturday, June 23. For those who are interested, we will be traveling to Okmulgee via Wainwright Road.

The ride will start at Highway 69 and Wainwright Road just south of Muskogee at 2PM continuing to the College of the Muscogee Nation before ending at the Claude Cox Omniplex.

For those riders who are considering joining us for this part of the ride–Helmets, please! Be prepared for the summer heat!

Thanks everyone for all of the support and well-wishes.

We’ll see you soon,

John Beaver–Program Manager/Director and Curator, Muscogee (Creek) Nation Museum and Cultural Center

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Clarksville to Fort Smith, AR

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Morrilton to Clarksville, AR

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Little Rock to Morrilton, AR

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Brinkley to Little Rock, AR

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Happy Father’s Day

Happy Father’s Day from the Trail of Tears…I wish all the Dads a blessed day!

We ride to Little Rock, AR today! We hope you enjoy the newly posted pictures and MVTO for the continued support and well wishes. I am excited and anxious as we approach our Friday arrival to Fort Gibson, OK. A little reminder about our event/presentation @ 10am at the Fort…hope to see many people there as we honor our ancestors who passed through the fort upon entering Indian Territory.

John continues to literally impress and inspire with his effort on the bicycle. Today we have Mr. Andrew Lowe rejoining the ride! Lastly, many thanks to the hosts we have been gracious enough to have met and visited with, most recently Mr Danny Crownover and Mark Robertson from Gadsden.

Talk to y’all again soon!

Mvto!

- Justin Giles, Assistant Director – MCN Museum and Cultural Center

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